Category: Windows OS-Level Issues

Windows NIC shows wrong network type
article #1323, updated 258 days ago

To change it in local policy:

Local Computer Policy > Computer Configuration >Windows Settings > Security Settings > Network List Manager Policies >[properties of the the network name in question] >network location tab then pick your Location type.

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Ultimate Windows Tweaker 4
article #1322, updated 261 days ago

An excellent tool from The Windows Club. Found by the excellent Joe Busby.

https://www.thewindowsclub.com/ultimate-windows-tweaker-4-windows-10

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Remove "Internet Explorer Maintenance" settings from GPO
article #1321, updated 261 days ago

If your Active Directory dates back to Server 2003, you may have “Internet Explorer Maintenance” items in GPO. These are obsolete IE control specifications which can not be edited on newer servers. To delete these items:

support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/2722241/policy-reporting-tools-indicate-empty-internet-explorer-maintenance-po

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Get Windows Key via Powershell
article #1320, updated 262 days ago

Tested under Windows 10 only, this works well for non-OEM:

(Get-WmiObject -query ‘select * from SoftwareLicensingService’).OA3xOriginalProductKey

and this appears to be good for OEM/sticker:

(GCIM SoftwareLicensingService).OA3xOriginalProductKey

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Windows 10 Distributed Updates
article #1308, updated 328 days ago

Updates are being distributed to Windows 10 via peer-to-peer methods, in addition to cloud-to-PC. This will be essential to handle the big build files, 4 gigabyte plus, at many sites.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/deployment/update/waas-delivery-optimization

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Windows Search major disk usage
article #1302, updated 357 days ago

If you see that Windows built-in search components (any of several, including the Indexer, Cortana, etc.) are using a lot of your disk bandwidth, run this in an administrative Powershell:

Add-AppxPackage -Path “C:\Windows\SystemApps\Microsoft.Windows.Cortana_cw5n1h2txyewy\Appxmanifest.xml” -DisableDevelopmentMode -Register

It appears to reset or reload Cortana or a big chunk of it, and probably disable “Development Mode” too. One web reference stated that the above has to be run in a newly created local admin profile to work.

Also, if you’re in a former (or, God forbid, current) SBS environment, make sure the SBS client is removed, and make sure GPO isn’t automatically reinstalling it.

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Change Remote Desktop (Terminal Server) Licensing from Per-Device to Per-User
article #1299, updated 365 days ago

This is easily done in Local Group Policy, on the machine with the RDS licensing server:

Computer Configuration/
Administrative Templates/
Windows Components/
Remote Desktop Services/
Remote Desktop Session Host/
Licensing

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Group Policy: Machine Inactivity Limit (Lock Screen Force) in Security Settings
article #1298, updated 365 days ago

There is a setting in Windows Group Policy which will force lockscreen / locked screensaver after a machine considers itself inactive for a specified amount of time:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/security/threat-protection/security-policy-settings/interactive-logon-machine-inactivity-limit

This overrides all other related (e.g. screen saver) settings and PC-local settings. It’s located here in group policy:

Computer Configuration\Windows Settings\Security Settings\Local Policies\Security Options

and while creating/linking group policy on a server:

Computer Configuration\Policies\Windows Settings\Security Settings\Local Policies\Security Options

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DISM Fixes Windows 8.1 and 10
article #980, updated 454 days ago

Do this:

DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /StartComponentCleanup

and then this:

DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth

and then reboot. This handles a lot of SFC errors and others too.

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Rename desktops in Windows domain from command line
article #31, updated 528 days ago

The simplest appears to be thus:

wmic computersystem where caption='oldcomputername' rename newcomputername

If it is run from an administrative CMD and the machine is in good talking relationship with its domain controller, the PC and also AD rename will complete. If either prerequisite is not met, the rename will fail. A non-admin attempt fails with code 5, DC availability fails with 1355.

There is also tool, part of the 2003 server reskit and included later on, which can do the rename of a desktop from a domain controller:

NETDOM RENAMECOMPUTER OLDNAME /newname:NEWNAME /userd:domain\domainadmin /passwordd:password /force /reboot:0

It causes a reboot of the target machine. /reboot:0 means no delay; the number is in seconds.

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