Category: Servers

32-bit printer driver in 64-bit server! And the other way around!!!
article #129, updated 50 days ago

OK, so we have that problem increasingly common, a 64-bit server, trying to serve a printer to 32-bit client machines, or vice versa. It took me a while, but here are two different methods I have needed, depending on situation.

First, see if current drivers are downloadable for this printer in the server’s mode (bit-width). If they are, we are able to use method #1, which is probably preferable, although method #2 may still work too. Here’s method #1:

  1. Download them in both 32-bit and 64-bit versions, install the printer to the server in its preferred (32- or 64-bit) mode, and test. Unpack the other driver in a good location, you will need it soon.
  2. Get the printer properties up, go to the Sharing section, set up sharing. Don’t publish to the Active Directory yet or you might drive somebody crazy. Click on Additional Drivers.
  3. You’ll notice “x86” or “x64” is unchecked, because you haven’t installed the other driver yet. Check it, and then hit OK. The system will now demand to be directed to where you have unpacked the other driver. Do so. It might work just at this point! But…
  4. …it may ask you for one of two additional things. It may ask for 32-bit install media; or, it may ask for particular files, e.g., ntprint.inf, or ntprint.in_, in 32-bit mode. It’s important to realize that the 32-bit requirement is for equivalent OS: a 2008R2 install requires files from 32-bit Windows 7, 64-bit Server 2008 requires files from 32-bit Vista, and 64-bit Server 2003 requires files from 32-bit XP. If you can supply these files, do it, and you’ll be done shortly; it has to be done just once per server, not per printer. If you cannot do this, you’ll need to use method #2.

If you cannot use method #1, or if there are no downloadable drivers for your printer, we go to method #2:

  1. If there are no downloadable drivers from the printer manufacturer, install the printer to the server using Windows built-in drivers. Under Windows 7 / 2008R2, there is a “Windows Update” clickable in the driver list, by which you can retrieve a much larger set of drivers than is included by default; this is highly recommended. The included Microsoft generics may help, there is a PCL6 and a PS.
  2. If there are downloadable drivers from the printer manufacturer, for the server OS, use them.
  3. Install the printer to the client. If you’re using Windows Update or built-in drivers on the server, use them on the client too. Otherwise, make sure that the client drivers are the same type as the server’s, i.e., PCL6 and PCL6, PCL5e and PCL5e, PS3 and PS3.
  4. On the client, log in as network administrator. Open up the properties of the printer. Click on Advanced. Click on New Driver. Notice the name of the wizard: you’re actually installing a driver onto the server, not onto the client!
  5. Choose the driver you want to install onto the server. Click Next et cetera. Watch the client driver install onto the server, over the network!
  6. Check it out the drivers on the server, Shared tab, Additional Drivers button. You’ll see one you need listed. You are done!
  7. If the New Driver method does not work, try doing approximately the same from within the Additional Drivers button; it works also, to add drivers to server from workstation, as long as you’re logged in as network admin.

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AMD Motherboard and Video Drivers for HPE MicroServers
article #1381, updated 469 days ago

Here they are.

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Tweaking Windows File Servers and Filesystem Performance
article #1319, updated 778 days ago

Some interesting items here for overall filesystem performance:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/administration/performance-tuning/role/file-server/

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Simple Microsoft SQL performance gains
article #1256, updated 812 days ago

Open up your SQL server instance in the Studio. Go to the Properties of your instance.

Under Memory, you will see a minimum and a maximum. Set the minimum to 1024 (MB) or 2048. Reserve 4 gigabytes RAM minimum for the OS, add some more for anything else running on it, then use the rest as your maximum memory usage setting.

Also under Memory, you will see “Minimum memory per query”. Default is 1024. Set this to 2048.

Then under Processors, check “Boost SQL Server priority”.

And click OK.

Some info here:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/database-engine/configure-windows/server-memory-server-configuration-options?view=sql-server-2017#max_server_memory

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Rename desktops in Windows domain from command line
article #31, updated 1039 days ago

The simplest appears to be thus:

wmic computersystem where caption='oldcomputername' rename newcomputername

If it is run from an administrative CMD and the machine is in good talking relationship with its domain controller, the PC and also AD rename will complete. If either prerequisite is not met, the rename will fail. A non-admin attempt fails with code 5, DC availability fails with 1355.

There is also tool, part of the 2003 server reskit and included later on, which can do the rename of a desktop from a domain controller:

NETDOM RENAMECOMPUTER OLDNAME /newname:NEWNAME /userd:domain\domainadmin /passwordd:password /force /reboot:0

It causes a reboot of the target machine. /reboot:0 means no delay; the number is in seconds.

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High Memory Use on Servers by NTFS Metafiles
article #1199, updated 1217 days ago

Great info here:

http://woshub.com/fixing-high-memory-usage-by-metafile-on-windows-server-2008-r2/

using this for investigation:

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff700229.aspx

and this service for cure:

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=9258

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Open source LAN-local search
article #1189, updated 1247 days ago

There are several tools fitting this general description, but this writer has only found one turnkey installable. This is Yacy:

yacy.net

Very fast, quite straightforward to set up and configure (though you’ll learn a thing or two if you’ve never thought about search very much!), almost not at all counterintuitive. It can be easily set up as either a LAN-local search server or part of its distributed WWW network.

There is a runner up, Open Search Server:

www.opensearchserver.com

If its documentation were remotely adequate, it might be comparable, but sadly, not.

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Migrate Windows file shares between servers, with permissions
article #1168, updated 1290 days ago

Good article, sent by the remarkable Zach Hogan:

https://sysblogging.com/2015/12/29/how-to-migrate-windows-file-server-shares-with-ntfs-permissions/

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GUI SFTP/SCP (SSH File Transfer) Server for Windows
article #1166, updated 1304 days ago

SFTP, also called SCP, is not, accurately speaking, FTP. SFTP is “SSH File Transfer”, transfer of files over the SSH protocol, and not the FTP protocol. The FTP protocol has its own excellent secure (FTPS) capabilities, FileZilla being a recommended graphical FTP server for Windows; but GUI servers for SSH are much harder to find. Happily, here is one:

https://www.solarwinds.com/free-tools/free-sftp-server/registration?program=961&c=70150000000FJX0&CMP=BIZ-TAD-PCWDLD-SW_WW_X_PP_PPD_FT_EN_TOPFT_SW-SFTP-X_X_X_X-X

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Current version of PHP and other items on CentOS and RHEL
article #850, updated 1374 days ago

Here are two very helpful sources. For many general things, the EPEL repository:

http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/EPEL

and for PHP and other server-specifics, current versions and others more recent than the OSes supply by themselves, Remi:

http://rpms.remirepo.net/

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